Tag Archives: holiday

“Willie Weaver”

I was driving to work this morning, listening to a podcast from Alistair Begg, when a flash of white blew by me two lanes to my right, cut in front of the car just ahead of me in the center lane, and came to an abrupt stop at the red light just ahead. I pulled up just to his left and off his left rear fender. The car was a very nice Mercedes E-class sedan. The driver, a male appearing to be in his early to mid-40’s stared straight ahead with a firm grip on the steering wheel. When the light turned green, he was the first to clear the intersection. As we proceeded down the street, he swerved right, then left, allowing minimal clearance between his rear and the front end of the cars he was passing. Then, at the next red light, I pulled up alongside him again. For several miles we repeated the pattern, with the driver I dubbed “Willie Weaver” cutting in and out of traffic until the great equalizers in their bright red hue lined us up to start all over again. Finally, Willie Weaver turned right and we continued on our separate ways.

Willie got me to thinking about how we approach life these days. How much stress do we pile onto ourselves with no good reason for doing so? How often do we live at breakneck speed, only to have life slow us down while the rest of the world catches up? Are we running on adrenaline, or are we living life at a comfortable pace while still accomplishing our daily tasks and goals? I’m not knocking Willie, for at one point in my life I was a lot like him. I’m thankful that I’ve learned over the years to relax, take life a bit easier and enjoy the scenery along the way.

Friends, as another long holiday weekend is upon us, slow down. If you’re driving, don’t be Willie Weaver. Enjoy the time off work (if you get it), enjoy your family, enjoy your friends. Celebrate the anniversary of our great country’s independence and take time to be thankful that you are an American. I hope my friend Willie is able to do so as well.

Slow down, you move too fast
You got to make the morning last
Just kicking down the cobblestones
Looking for fun and feelin’ groovy
Ba da da da da da da, feelin’ groovy

Hello, lamppost, what’cha knowin’?
I’ve come to watch your flowers growin’
Ain’t’cha got no rhymes for me?
Doot-in doo-doo, feelin’ groovy
Ba da da da da da da, feelin’ groovy

I got no deeds to do
No promises to keep
I’m dappled and drowsy and ready to sleep
Let the morning time drop all its petals on me
Life, I love you
All is groovy

~ Paul Simon, The 59th Street Bridge Song

Black Thursday? No. Happy Thanksgiving!

In this age of American consumerism run amok, as large retailers battle one another for our Christmas shopping dollars even on this national day of Thanksgiving, I hope and pray that each of us will use this day for its original intention:

The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consiousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union. ~ Abraham Lincoln

Today, let us set aside our seemingly endless desire for more. Let us take stock of what we’ve been given and take nothing for granted. Let us look beyond ourselves to the Creator of all things, and humbly approach His throne in a spirit of gratitude and thanksgiving. The shopping can wait. Today let us give thanks for the many blessings we enjoy as a nation, as families, and as freedom-loving Americans.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving postcard circa 1900 showing a tur...

Thanksgiving postcard circa 1900 showing a turkey and football player. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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